Tedious Journeys: Autoethnography by Women of Color in Academe (Counterpoints #375) (Paperback)

Tedious Journeys: Autoethnography by Women of Color in Academe (Counterpoints #375) Cover Image
$41.95
Email or call for price.

Other Books in Series

This is book number 375 in the Counterpoints series.

Description


Tedious Journeys: Autoethnography by Women of Color in Academe lends voice to the experiences of women of color in predominantly White institutions. Its purpose is to create dialogue and develop support networks for faculty members who may have similar experiences, and to increase institutions' awareness of how faculty of color experience life within the academy, which can then lead to increasing their attraction and retention. This book will be useful in education classes that deal with diversity and administration in higher education.

About the Author


The Editors: Cynthia Cole Robinson is Associate Professor of Education at Purdue University Calumet where she also serves as Chair of the Elementary Education Program. She received her Ph.D. in curriculum and instruction from the University of Illinois at Chicago. She is the author of From the Classroom to the Corner: Female Dropouts' Reflections on Their School Years (Lang, 2007). Her areas of interest include social justice, urban education and race, class, and gender studies. Pauline Clardy is Assistant Professor of Education in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction at Illinois State University, where she also serves as Coordinator of the Bilingual Education Program. She earned a Ph.D. in curriculum design, an M.Ed. in instructional leadership, and a B.A. from the University of Illinois. Her research interests include qualitative studies that focus on the education of linguistic and cultural minorities. She has presented her work nationally and internationally.


Product Details
ISBN: 9781433107672
ISBN-10: 1433107678
Publisher: Peter Lang Inc., International Academic Publi
Publication Date: February 4th, 2010
Pages: 199
Language: English
Series: Counterpoints